Lines drains and droves – Fenland #4

Andrew Bartram (WarboysSnapper) has added a photo to the pool:

Lines drains and droves - Fenland #4

Part of an ongoing project, Sinar F camera 4×5 and Ilford fibre paper darkroom prints.
Foma film developed in Ilford ID11 1+1 10 mins

[from Graffi’s That Retro Lo-Fi Look group on Flickr]

It’s Great Here – 2014

Andrew Bartram (WarboysSnapper) has added a photo to the pool:

It's Great Here - 2014

Fuji FP100c
Bleached Neg Scan
250 Land Camera

[from Graffi’s That Retro Lo-Fi Look group on Flickr]

The Best Way to Clean Up a Photo’s Background with Photoshop

If you’re a portrait or product photographer who uses seamless white backdrops for your subjects, you might have noticed that after a few hours of shooting, your nice clean backdrop has morphed into something with smudges, footprints, and other detritus, creating a post-processing headache. Aaron Nace did some research and came up with this quick and easy way to clean up your background in Photoshop:

When a background needs touching-up, most people turn to the clone stamp tool, healing brush tool, or patch tool in Photoshop. Yet each of these methods can take a long time, and it can be hard to keep the shadows intact even with the deftest of hands.

tough-up-white-backdrop-photoshop

Holga, next week we do the fountain !

P. Marione has added a photo to the pool:

Holga, next week we do the fountain !

playing with Holga

[from Graffi’s That Retro Lo-Fi Look group on Flickr]

Jesus

thedecentexposure has added a photo to the pool:

Jesus

[from Graffi’s That Retro Lo-Fi Look group on Flickr]

6 Great Reasons to Get over Post-Processing Anxiety

I’m baffled when my workshop students tell me that they find image post-processing to be a chore, a dreaded task that prevents them from even looking at their beautiful photographs more than once. If you’re one of those types, I’m here to tell you that you’re missing out on a delicious second hit of creative joy.

1 – Don’t Miss Out – Post-Processing is Half the Fun

Night Photography with high ISO - Gavin Hardcastle

Unprocessed version below. Total processing time = five minutes. Steps taken:

  1. Boosted blacks and shadows
  2. Reduced whites
  3. Increased exposure by +1
  4. Increased clarity
  5. Increase contrast
  6. Subtle noise reduction
  7. Subtle sharpening

#44

.simstorm has added a photo to the pool:

#44

praktica plc3 #44
carl zeiss jena pancolar electric 50mm 1,8
expired kodak 200

follow me: www.facebook.com/simphotostream

[from Graffi’s That Retro Lo-Fi Look group on Flickr]

up against the wall

TIBBA69 has added a photo to the pool:

up against the wall

© All rights reserved. Use without permission is illegal

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flickriver | fluidr | instagram

[from Graffi’s That Retro Lo-Fi Look group on Flickr]

How to Create an Artistic Double Exposure Effect in Photoshop

Traditionally, a double exposure is created by simply snapping two shots in one frame on a film camera. Sometimes, you get it right and the outcome is incredible, but lots of times you may not like the effect or even intend to do it. Now, with a few Photoshop techniques, you can create your own unique double exposure that is pretty much guaranteed to turn out exactly as you envisioned it. Basically, you can bring your imagination to life. Here, you’ll learn how to combine two images to create a final high quality piece of art using blend modes:

In the video tutorial, Aaron Nace uses a regular portrait of a woman on a gray background and a picture of some flowers on white to create a great artistic double exposed image. He chose these images because of the high contrast between light and dark. When choosing your images, think tree against a clear sky rather than a cluttered photo of your backyard.

Sipho

Salva G. has added a photo to the pool:

Sipho

Olympus Pen FT + F.Zuiko 38mm F1.8
Kodak E100G !00 ASA
Scanned negative

[from Graffi’s That Retro Lo-Fi Look group on Flickr]