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12 Photography Ideas You Must Try in 2015

We’re two weeks into 2015 as of this writing, and can you believe it? How are your New Year’s Resolutions holding up? Have you taken those photos, lost that weight and started exercising? Yeah, me neither. That’s why I’m intentionally posting this article now, rather than with the flood of similar articles that appeared about two weeks ago, since I’m… Read more →

Hipster-Vintagelarger

5 Composition Techniques That Go Beyond the Rule of Thirds

We all know about the rule of thirds by now, but there’s a lot more to framing a photo. Read more →

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Photoshop Tutorial: How I made “Rainy Sidewalk”

Photoshop Tutorial: How I made “Rainy Sidewalk”. This Photoshop tutorial will show you how to create a realistic rainy sidewalk photo manipulation effect Read more →

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How to Retouch Wrinkles in Photoshop

There are many ways of removing wrinkles in Photoshop, and there are even third party plugins that do the job for you. However, the goal isn’t always complete removal since that can leave your subjects looking like they came out of a cartoon. You can never be perfect, and when you see a picture where everything is perfect, there is one thought that instantly pops into your head: “That’s Photoshopped.” Luckily, Aaron Nace demonstrates a quick and easy way to remove wrinkles that lends itself to realistic results:

Nace presents two ways to go about retouching wrinkles.

wrinkles on skin

Original Photo

 Complete Removal of Wrinkles

The first and most commonly used method to use the healing brush tool and simply get rid of the wrinkles by painting over them.

But as you can see, if you remove the wrinkles completely, something will be missing from that picture; the photoshopping will be obvious. It’s normal for an older person to have wrinkles, after all.

Wrinkles on skin completely deleted

Wrinkles Removed Completely

Reduction of Wrinkles

Nace recommends this second method for more natural looking portraits. Here’s how it’s done:

  1. Duplicate the background layer by hitting Ctrl/Cmd + J.
  2. Make sure you’re working on a layer with pixels.
  3. Select the Clone Stamp tool.
  4. Change the brush mode for the Clone Stamp to Lighten.
  5. Sample an area near a wrinkle and start painting over the wrinkle.
Wrinkles on skin reduced but are still present

Wrinkles Reduced

If you use the clone stamp tool directly on the layer, with the brush set to lighten and sample and paint over the wrinkles, you’re effectively removing the shadow in the wrinkle while keeping most of the texture. It’s an easy technique, since it doesn’t copy the texture like a normal clone stamp brush—it just uses the color. That way you keep some of the wrinkles in order to keep the natural look. This can be used over many other imperfections on the skin.

As you can see, the difference in methods is quite evident.

If you use Nace’s second (and preferred) method to reduce wrinkles rather than remove them, you’ll be much less likely to get the “way too much Photoshop” comments.

Further training: Really Easy Retouching

Go to full article: How to Retouch Wrinkles in Photoshop

What are your thoughts on this article? Join the discussion on Facebook or Google+

Article from: PictureCorrect

[this post syndicated from Picture Correct]

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Graffi's Action Effects for Photoshop Elements Sampler Pack - 7 effects from the most popular sets in the Graffishop

3…2…1…Actions!! A Guide to Using Photoshop Actions to Speed-Up Your Workflow

Do you find yourself doing the same processes in Photoshop over and over again? Do you wish you knew a way to quickly do amazing things to your photos without going through a bunch of steps? If you haven’t entered the world of ACTIONS yet, let me be your guide! I’m going to teach you how to install Photoshop Actions that you purchase or download on the web, and even better, how to create your very own Actions.

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Photographing Flowers in their Natural Surroundings

Flowers are naturally beautiful, and easy to find in the warmer months of the year, and so make a great subject for a photo. This article covers the top tips to get great photos when photographing flowers in their natural surroundings.

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7 Tips for a More Anonymous Approach to Street Photography

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

Can you imagine a world without street photography? Think of the legacy that Doisneau, Cartier-Bresson, and lesser known pioneers of the genre left for us to enjoy for generations to come. We can all play a part in documenting the world around us, one photograph at a time.

One of the most common reservations people have about shooting street photography is the feeling of invading their subjects’ privacy. It’s a legitimate concern and one that can be addressed by following simple rules of respect. I always urge my workshop students to refrain from photographing people in vulnerable or embarrassing situations. It’s a simple rule: You should be able to put yourself in your subject’s shoes and be okay with your photograph being shared on social media. Photographing a beautiful story in a public place should never be a concern, anywhere in the world, if it is done with respect.

Unfortunately, as the genre gains more and more popularity, many photographers forget those essential rules of respect. That makes it even more difficult and intimidating for others to make their first steps in the exciting world of street photography.

If you are still hesitant, there are ways to include the human element in your photography without revealing their identity. Those methods can be very rewarding and make for very artistic images. So here are a few tips to help you do more anonymous street photography.

1. Photograph the back of people

Not every subject photographed from behind will make a strong image. Gesture will be the biggest factor to consider. Background and light are also strong elements. Basically, your image should be stronger shot from behind than if you had photographed the same subjects while facing them.

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

2. Minimalist approach

In a minimalist approach to street photography, your subject is usually quite small but becomes the focal point in an interesting urban landscape. Look for interesting architecture, repeated patterns, geometrical shapes, etc. They all make for very interesting backgrounds. Wait for the right subject to enter your frame, et voilà!

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

3. Silhouettes

Who doesn’t love to photograph silhouettes? Again, the subject has to be well defined. There should be as few distracting elements in front of your subject as possible. Don’t hesitate to blow out the highlights for a more dramatic silhouette. The less distinguishable the background, the better! Photographing the right gesture or step are the key to a successful silhouette.

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

Shooting into the sun is also a great way to create a dramatic effect while maintaining the anonymity of your subject.

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

4. Far away subjects

Street photography is best done up close for a more intimate image, but shooting from above or far away can make interesting photographs as well. The human elements, even small, draw the eye of the viewer without revealing their identity.

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

5. Motion

Long exposure to create some motion blur is also a really fun way to photograph people. This works well in busy places, such as train stations. The architecture has to be interesting as it will become the highlight of the image by being the sharpest element.

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

6. Darkness

Crank up that ISO! Night street photography can be so much fun. Use your best judgement and stay safe!

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

7. Abstract

Think outside the box. Street photography doesn’t have to be about faces. Find more abstract ways to photograph strangers.

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

©Valerie Jardin

How do you approach candid street photography? Please share your experience with the dPS readers.

The post 7 Tips for a More Anonymous Approach to Street Photography by Valerie Jardin appeared first on Digital Photography School.


[post syndicated from Digital Photography School]

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Graffi's Action Effects for Photoshop Elements Sampler Pack - 7 effects from the most popular sets in the Graffishop

52 photography projects: a photo idea to try every week in 2015

Taking on a photography project is a great way to get yourself out of a photography rut and to bring some focus to your picture-taking. Placing some constraints on what you’re going to take photos of or what camera gear you’ll use really does force you to become more creative, too. Read more →

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In-Depth Milky Way Timelapse Tutorial for Beginners

Making a timelapse is usually a long and hard process. There are so many things that you need to keep in mind. To help you out along the way, Ian Norman has created a pretty detailed tutorial for shooting motion timelapse sequences of the Milky Way:

Scouting a Location

The thing that you need to keep in mind is that you’ll need some experience in astrophotography before you tackle a timelapse. Finding your way around in pitch darkness isn’t that easy, nor is manually setting your focus and all the accompanying issues that come with night sky photography.

Unlike Norman, I’d use a red headlamp for navigating in the dark. Red light doesn’t ruin your eye adjustment to the dark, while white and other colors do. This is for your own safety and the safety of anyone who’s with you.

Once you have your gear checked, you’ll need to find the right day of the month to go shooting. This should be a day near the new moon. The moon reflects a good amount of sunlight and can completely block out the Milky Way.

phases of the moon

Moon Phases

To locate the Milky way you can use any star chart app. Most of them do the trick.

Camera Settings

  • Set your camera to record in RAW so you can get the best results during post-processing
  • Disable long exposure noise reduction.
  • Disable auto review to reserve battery power and eliminate the extra light that it produces.
  • Use custom (3500–4800 Kelvin) or daylight white balance.
  • Set the lens to manual focus mode.
  • Once you’ve achieved focus, use a piece of gaffer’s tape on the lens to “lock” the focus.

raw file settings

  • Follow the 500 rule for shutter speed, and expose slightly to the right (this means overexposing a bit without blowing out the highlights), in order to reduce noise by increasing the signal amount. Exposing to the right (ETTR) is quite useful with RAW files (which you should use) because the gain is quite bigger than the loss.
500 astrophotography rule

Rule of 500

  • Start with an ISO of 6400 for f/2.8 or higher lenses and you can tone down the ISO for lenses with wider aperture.

Norman uses quite a complex slider system, which he thoroughly explains in the video.

camera slider

Post-Processing a Night Sky Timelapse

Once you have shot the files, it’s time to post-process and compile them.

Load all the RAW files up in Lightroom (or equivalent), then boost the vibrance and saturation to the maximum point. This way you’ll be able to tweak the white balance until the image contains equal amount of orange and blue, same goes for the tint. Then, reset the vibrance and saturation to revert back to the original look and feel. The rest of the image can be processed by your preference.

Once you’re satisfied with one of the images (choose one somewhere in the middle of the sequence), copy or synchronize the settings to the whole sequence. Make sure you do lens corrections and remove fringing and vignettes.

white balance super saturation

How super saturated properly white balanced image should look

Now you can export your JPEGs, or TIFFs if you want lossless. Resize to your desired resolution on export. Norman used 4k, thus setting the long edge of the photo to 3840. Your long edge should be 1920 for HD resolution.

All that is left now is importing the images to Adobe After Effects. You can do this by double clicking the project panel and selecting the first image (images must be in the same folder and alphabetically named). Usually After Effects detects image sequences; if it doesn’, just check the image sequence box. Once you have the images loaded, create a new sequence and do your edits. Then you can render your video.

jpeg sequence

Don’t forget to check this box

If you know what you’re doing, you can fiddle with the codecs, if you want the video for Youtube/Vimeo. Just choose H 264 codec, and set some balanced values (usually there are presets that do that for you). Keep in mind that depending on the things like video length, image resolution, and processing power the rendering time varies. Sometimes it can be several minutes, but sometimes it can take days to complete. Patience is a virtue here.

codec setting

You might notice some flicker in your video. This occurs when some shots are exposed a bit differently than others. There are several plugins that help with removing this phenomena. Some of the most used are: MSU DeFlicker, Donald Graft’s DeFlicker and DeSeRt.

While there are endless skills and techniques that go into creating timelapse sequences, Norman’s tutorial is a pretty in depth guide for anyone new to the genre.

To learn more about astrophotography, check out:
Shooting Stars: How to Photograph the Moon and Stars.

Go to full article: In-Depth Milky Way Timelapse Tutorial for Beginners

What are your thoughts on this article? Join the discussion on Facebook or Google+

Article from: PictureCorrect

[this post syndicated from Picture Correct]

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How to Split Tone Black and White Photos in Lightroom

Toning originated as a darkroom process designed to extend the longevity of black and white prints. Toning in Lightroom means moving a few sliders Read more →